How to Prevent Repetitive Strain Injuries

Gavin Evans 1 (1)

What’s The T?

Repetitive strain injuries are often seen and found in elite level athletes, however an injury like this can develop through playing a sport or regularly using the same muscles. A RSI (repetitive strain injury) is normally caused my using an area of the body more than what most people would consider normal. This is not always a bad thing, as to become good at anything in life you must do it a lot, usually more than others, so without the right knowledge an injury can occur!

Over the last year or so many people have been coming to me for fitness advice and table tennis advice. A regular conversation I have is around an injury one may have just developed, and they can’t understand why. Almost unequivocally it is an RSI (repetitive strain injury). Now a common injury area in table tennis is the shoulder, so in this blog I will explain how to prevent this injury and sustain a strong stable shoulder.

Pain in the front of the shoulder (Anterior Deltoid) with a sharp shooting sensation when raising the arm are all common occurrences. This is caused by a lifetime of f/h exercises which draw the shoulder forward, into a protracted position and inevitably create strong pectoral muscles and neglect the back muscles around the scapular causing them to weaken. Once the back muscles are weakened this causes a loss of shoulder control and instability which then causes pain to your rotator cuff muscles Supraspinatus and Subscapularis (front shoulder).

 

Gym

If you are a table tennis player or a tennis player, when you work out in the gym be sure to do a lot of strength work around your mid and lower trapezius. This is the major muscle surrounding the shoulder blade. Below I have listed a few great exercises to do to strengthen your back and mid trapezius muscles:

  • High Pulley Cable Row
  • Pull Up with hand facing you, grip slightly narrower than shoulder width
  • Bent Over Lateral Dumbbell Raise
  • Reverse Pec Dec
  • Standing Cable Rear Deltoid Extension
  • Bent Over Cable Lateral Raise
  • Seated Row
  • Prone Trap Raises with a dumbbell in a Hammer Grip
  • Latissimus Dorsi Pull Down
  • Bent Over Barbell Row
  • Reverse Latissimus Dorsi Pull Down

 

The Shoulder

 The Glenohumeral is a synovial ball and socket joint commonly known as the shoulder with a large range of movement and somewhat complex as there are many muscles which attach to it.

The four rotator cuff muscles are extremely important and must be worked correctly. They are the Subscapularis and the Supraspinatus located at the front of the shoulder and the Infraspinatus and Teres Minor located at the back of the shoulder. These muscles connect your shoulder blade (Scapula) to the Humerus your arm bone.

It is also extremely important to remember, the muscles which need working the most are not the ones which look good or are easily seen! It’s the ones which cannot be seen but are there to stabilise a joint and add controlled strength to prevent injuries. I have put a link below to give you some ideas of some crucial exercises to help stabilise and strengthen the shoulder!

http://accidentalamazon.com/ther-scap-ex.pdf

These exercises can be performed with a Theraband or a resistant band. The exercises are to be done very regularly, performing the exercise for 20 repetitions 3 times each.

 

How do I know which muscles I need to work to prevent an RSI?

Tip:

This question is important to understand. The main concept of this is to recognise which muscles you are using most in your everyday life then consciously train the opposing muscles group to equal out the dominance. For example if in life you use your chest muscles all the time, then train your back muscles, if in life you use your quadriceps all the time, then train your hamstrings, if in life you use your biceps all the time, then train your triceps, if in life you use your abdominal muscles all the time, then train your lower back muscles.

I hope this helps. If you have any questions about your own development please contact me without hesitation.

 

Gavin Evans

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